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Trackman Fundamentals

Trackman measures 27 different data parameters that tell us everything that the golf club is doing through the impact zone and everything that the golf ball is doing in flight. Each parameter has value in our improvement process, but understanding Club Path and Face Angle is essential for the student to know why their golf ball flies the way it does, and how to change it while on the golf course. Below are explanations of Club Path and Face Angle. Also included is a video explaining how Club Path and Face Angle determine ball flight. For a full list of definitions of all of Trackman’s data parameters, click here

Club Path

Club Path is the direction the club head is moving (left or right) at impact.

Most golfers relate this number to hitting the ball “in-to-out” or “out-to-in”. 

A positive value means the club is moving to the right of the target at impact (“in-to-out” for a right-handed golfer) and a negative value means it is moving to the left of the target (“out-to-in” for a right-handed golfer). 

To hit a straight shot, the club path should be zero. The club path is part of what influences the curvature of the shot. It also is part of what determines the ball’s starting direction. 

An “in-to-out” club path is necessary to hit a draw and an “out-to-in” club path is necessary to hit a fade. The optimal club path depends on the type of shot the golfer wants to play. A golfer may want to hit a 5 yard fade, straight shot, or 10 yard draw. Each of these shots has its own optimal club path.

Face Angle

Face Angle is the direction the club face is pointed (right or left) at impact 

Most golfers refer to this as having an “open” or “closed” club face. 

A positive value means the club face is pointed to the right of the target at impact (“open” for a right-handed golfer) and a negative value means the club face is pointed to the left of the target (“closed” for a right-handed golfer). 

Face angle is the most important number when determining the starting direction of the golf ball. The ball will launch very closely to the direction the club face (face angle) is pointed at impact. 

To hit a straight shot, the face angle should be zero. The optimal face angle depends on the type of shot the golfer wants play. 

A golfer may want to hit a 5 yard fade, straight shot, or 10 yard draw. Each of these shots has its own optimal face angle. 

Face to Path